Meet Greyhound.com, the site that doesn’t allow password changes

Enlarge / This is what Greyhound.com e-mails you when you forget your password. When it comes to websites with bad password policies, there’s no shortage of bad actors. Sites—some operated by banks or other financial services—that allow eight- or even six-character passwords, sometimes even allowing letters to be entered in either upper- or lower-case? Yup. Sites that e-mail forgotten passwords in plaintext? Sadly, all the time. Ars largely stopped reporting…

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What is Google WiFi? Everything you need to know

Google WiFi has been out in the US since the end of last year, but as is often the case with big tech launches, other countries have had to wait. For people in the UK, that wait is almost over, as it debuts in the UK next week, on April 6 to be precise. Maybe you’ve heard about Google WiFi, and perhaps something about mesh networking, but you’re still not…

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ISPs say your Web browsing and app usage history isn’t “sensitive”

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) ISPs that want the federal government to eliminate broadband privacy rules say that your Web browsing and app usage data should not be classified as “sensitive” information. “Web browsing and app usage history are not ‘sensitive information,’” CTIA said in a filing with the Federal Communications Commission yesterday. CTIA is the main lobbyist group representing mobile broadband providers such as AT&T, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile USA, and Sprint.…

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How Trump’s cybersecurity quest could reshape the internet

This feature has been brought to you by IPVanish Following the inauguration of President Donald Trump and the induction of a new administration, many concerns ranging from foreign policy to national debt still weigh heavily on Americans. It is within this ever-growing list of concerns that the topic of online privacy seems to get shuffled into and often forgotten about. Mainstream discussions about cybersecurity are almost always reactive to instances…

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5 things you need to know about bendable displays

Look at your phone screen. It’s flat, right? For decades, displays have simply been flat pieces of glass or plastic that dictate the design of our technology. But, more recently, tech movers and shakers have turned to curved displays, a growing number of which can be found on computer monitors, televisions and phones. The question now, though, is: what’s next? After concurring curved displays with devices like the 2013 Samsung…

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2016 sees Internet Explorer usage collapse, Chrome surge

At the start of 2016, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer was still the most commonly used browser on the Web; it finished 2015 being used by about 46 percent of Web users, with 32 percent preferring Chrome, and 12 percent using Firefox. But Explorer’s days have been numbered ever since Microsoft essentially ended its development. While the venerable browser is still supported and still gets security updates, its features and standard support…

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UK man given first custodial sentence for piracy as torrent sites continue to flourish

In a milestone case, a man from Liverpool in the UK has been sentenced to 12 months in prison after pleading guilty to charges of illegally distributing top 40 chart singles online. The 39 year old had been uploading the latest singles to a variety of torrent sites, as well as distributing acapella tracks intended for DJ-ing and creating remixes through his own site. The sentence is the result of…

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Capturing the mundanity of humanity: the rapid rise of live-streaming

Sandi Thom’s “I Wish I Was A Punk Rocker (With Flowers In My Hair)” was a flop when it was released in October 2005. That it ended up topping the charts after it was re-released eight months later was down to the novelty of livestreaming. Her 21 Nights From Tooting tour was, as the name implies, 21 gigs performed over consecutive nights from her basement in Tooting. Each show was…

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Disgraced IT worker stole confidential Expedia e-mails even after he left

Enlarge (credit: Klaus with K) A former IT specialist at Expedia has admitted he used his privileged position to access executives’ e-mails in an insider stock-trading scheme that netted almost $330,000 in illegal profits, prosecutors said. During the two-year span that Jonathan Ly, 28, of San Francisco, worked at the online travel service, he accessed e-mail accounts belonging to the company’s chief financial officer, head of investor relations, and other…

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